Fairy Tale Tuesdays – The Wonderful Musician

Fairy Tale Tuesdays

Here goes another edition of Fairy Tale Tuesdays: The Wonderful Musician by the Brother’s Grimm.

My summary:

Once upon a time there was a wonderful musician who walked by himself in the forest.  After thinking for some time, he eventually got lonely and hoped to fetch a good companion for himself. So he took out his fiddle and began to play.  The beautiful music echoed through the trees, and shortly a wolf came trotting towards him.

“Oh! There is a wolf coming. I have no desire for him!” said the musician to himself.

“How beautifully you play,” said the wolf as he came near, “Please teach me!”

“It is easy to do,” said the musician, “but you must do all that I tell you.”

“I will obey you as a student would his master,” replied the wolf.

The musician led the wolf further into the woods, until they came to an oak tree.  The tree was old and hollow, with a cleft in the centre.

“If you want to learn, put your paws here,” said the Musician, pointing to the cleft.  The wolf put his paws on the tree, and the musician quickly picked up a stone and wedged it tight so that the wolf was stuck.

“Stay there until I come back,” said the musician.

After wandering for some more time, the musician was lonely and so thought to fetch another companion.  So he took out his fiddle and began to play, the beautiful music echoing through the trees.  It was not long before a fox came scampering up.

“Oh! There is a fox coming. I have no desire for him,” said the musician to himself.

“How beautifully you play,” said the fox as he came near, “Please teach me!”

“It is easy to do,” said the musician, “but you must do all that I tell you.”

“I will obey you as a student would his master,” replied the fox.

So, the musician led the fox further into the woods, until they came to a footpath with high bushes on either side.  The musician stopped and bent a branch down to the ground, stopping it with his foot, and then another from the other side.

“If you want to learn, give me your left paw,” said the musician. The fox offered up his paw and the musician fastened it to the left branch.

“Now your right paw,” the musician continued. The fox offered up his paw, and the musician fastened it to the right branch.  Then the musician stood back, and the branches snapped back, dangling the little fox in the air.

“Wait until I come back,” said the musician.

Again the musician wandered through the forest, and again he grew lonely.  So he thought he would try to fetch another companion.  He took his fiddle, once more filling the trees with beautiful music.  It was not long before a hare came jumping towards him.

“Oh! There is a hare coming. I have no desire for him!” said the musician to himself.

“How beautifully you play,” said the hare as he came near, “Please teach me!”

“It is easy to do,” said the musician, “but you must do all that I tell you.”

“I will obey you as a student would his master,” replied the hare.

The musician led the hare further into the woods, until they came to a clearing with an aspen tree in the middle. The musician took a string and tied one end around the hare’s neck and another around the tree.

“Now, if you want to learn then run twenty times around this tree,” declared the musician.  So the hare obeyed, but when it had run around twenty times the string was so tight that the hare was caught and he could not twist himself free.

“Wait there until I come back,” said the musician, who then went on his way.

While the musician was busy, the wolf had pushed and pulled and worked his paws out of the tree in which he was trapped.  Very angry, the wolf hurried after the musician, aiming to tear him to shreds.

The little fox saw the wolf running and cried, “Please help me, Brother wolf!  The musician has tricked me!” The wolf came and bit the cord hanging the fox up and together they raced after the musician to enact their revenge.  They came across the hare who cried for help and was also released.  All three then hurried after the musician.

After tricking the hare, the musician had once more grown lonely and hoped to gain a companion.  This time, when he played his fiddle, the music drew a woodsman forward, who came with his hatchet to listen to the music.

“Oh! At last there comes the right companion, another human being!” said the musician to himself.  The musician played his fiddle and the music was so beautiful and joyful that the woodsman stood quite transfixed by the sound.

As the woodsman stood listening, the wolf, fox, and hare ran up.  The woodsman saw that they meant no good, so he stood in front of the musician, hefting his axe menacingly.  This frightened the animals and they raced back into the forest.

The musician played once more, to thank the woodsman, before going on his way once again.

My take-aways:

  • This musician is a jerk.
  • And thus begins the tradition of bodyguards for rock stars.
  • I’m surprised that the wolf is not a bad guy in this tale, AND that the animals all get along (i.e. the wolf doesn’t eat the hare).

Also:

Balloons

Happy 100th Post!!!! I can’t believe I made it this far!  Thanks for your support!

A quick update about my posting schedule.  Unfortunately, my “real life” makes a 3x/week posting schedule challenging.  A few of the things I have going on are:

  • Spending time with my amazing husband
  • Working Full Time
  • Staying active by Training for a 5km AND doing regular yoga and spin classes
  • Learning French
  • Keeping in touch with family / friends
  • Learning / trying to keep creative (with painting, knitting, cooking, and general occasional craftiness)
  • Trying to keep up on housework and laundry!

All of these things take time away from reading – and while I have loved the challenge of reading two books a week, I’m finding it difficult to consistently find the time!  So, I’ll be keeping my Fairy Tale Tuesdays, and falling back to one book-review post a week.

Cheers!

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