Anne

anne-of-green-gables

I must admit, I hadn’t given Anne of Green Gables much thought in years, but the recent cover controversy sparked a fire under my tail.

Anne of Green Gables: New Edition Controversial Cover | As It Happens with Carol Off and Jeff Douglas | CBC Radio.

I, like many good Canadians, was horrified by this terrible abuse of a childhood favourite!

That pose!!  And a blonde!  What on earth were they thinking???   THAT cover and Anne of Green Gables have NO BUSINESS mixing!!

As an aside, I have always wanted red hair, perhaps because of Anne, and could never fathom her hatred of the colour.

Suffice it to say, I was inspired to re-read the whole series once again.   That includes:

  1. Anne of Green Gables (1908)
  2. Anne of Avonlea (1909)
  3. Anne of the Island (1915)
  4. Anne of Windy Poplars (1936)
  5. Anne’s House of Dreams (1917)
  6. Anne of Ingleside (1939)
  7. Rainbow Valley (1919)
  8. Rilla of Ingleside (1921)

Good old Lucy Maud Montgomery never fails to delight!   Anne made me laugh out loud (to the amusement of my husband) over her “scrapes” and weep over her sorrows.  (I never can read “Rilla of Ingelside” without shedding buckets of tears).  I love these books – the first and last in particular.  I do admit that the later books are perhaps more targeted to an older audience and I find that I appreciate them more and more as I grow up myself.  I love a book where I feel as if I would be good friends with the protagonist!

My journey into P.E.I. got me thinking though, of all the things that have CHANGED since dear Anne’s time.  I will admit I had to look up several terms – “wincey” and “ipecac” among them.   It makes me think of my Nana, who used to tell me of having to ride to school to teach on a donkey – a mean old animal which she hated.  It seems like things went from horses and buggies to cars and planes in such short order!  It seems funny to read about the early 1900s while listening to the background noise of the dishwasher or the snow hitting the windows of our cozy condo (on the 32nd floor!).  Even reading about Anne and her life on my kobo seems like a funny contrast.  I’m certainly glad for our modern conveniences!

I feel like these books are life-long friends, well-worth re-visiting every so often.  If, by shocking chance, you haven’t yet read them, I would highly recommend picking up “Anne of Green Gables” at the very least and losing yourself in Anne’s idyllic childhood for a spell.  Perhaps you’ll find her a “kindred spirit” after all.

5/5

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1 Comment

Filed under Classics (according to me), Young Adult Books

One response to “Anne

  1. Good choice to read! A few years ago I re-read all the way to Anne of Ingleside, as I don’t have the last two. My favourites were the first and second, followed by House of Dreams. I remember disliking Anne of Windy poplars, as everyone seemed either mean or saccharine, and the characters were all new, and the style of writing was different. Turns out it was one of the last volumes LM wrote.

    Yes, Anne is a lifelong friend!

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